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A look back at the women who pioneered the female ‘start-up’

Sometimes we need to look back to look forward. In this TED Talk, Dame Stephanie Shirley gives us insight into a time when being a successful woman in business went against the grain, and how things have changed dramatically for women wanting to start their own enterprise. So if you think you’re up against it, and are looking for inspiration, listen in to the kinds of challenges she faced when starting out.

‘Dame Stephanie Shirley – the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women …’

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About Jayne Ryan

Hello! I'm Jayne Ryan - Editor for Women Unlimited. It's such a joy to be part of this amazing community. I'm always looking to connect with women business owners who can inspire and inform our audience, so if you have something valuable to share please get in touch at editor@womenunlimitedworldwide.com or read our Guest Posting Guidelines. In my other life, I'm an author * editor * speaker and help women in business find and tell their own powerful story. You can find me over at jayneryan.com so come say Hi!

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4 comments

  1. If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there’s a good reason: It’s true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female.

  2. Wasn’t it Betty Friedan of feminist movement?

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